Agenda

ALL TIMES ARE PACIFIC DAYLIGHT TIME (LOS ANGELES, CA – USA)

Thursday, September 15
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
12:00 pm – 5:00 pm Conference Check-in/Registration - - - - -
Friday, September 16
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
12:00 pm – 5:00 pm Conference Check-in/Registration - - - - -
5:00 pm – 6:15 pm Welcome Reception NA - - - -
6:15 pm – 9:00 pm Session 1 - Opening Dinner and Keynote Address...Healthspan: Adding Life to Lifespan-Part 2 Scott Stoll, MD, FABPMR 2 2 2 2

SUMMARY

The epidemic of non-communicable diseases (NCD’s) is the number one cause of death globally. Yet, morbidity and lost quality of life are often a footnote. The rising rates of NCD’s and lost quality of life are placing an ever-increasing burden on individuals, families and healthcare systems. Nutrition and lifestyle are the best solution to the morbidity and disability from NCD’s and the optimal way to add years to life and life to those years. This presentation will highlight the evidence that nutrition and lifestyle dramatically improve both quantity and quality of life and thus healthspan.

OBJECTIVES

1. Examine the global burden of non-communicable disease related disability and its implications on individual quality of life and healthcare systems.
2. Distinguish the key differences between lifespan and healthspan.
3. Determine and utilize the basic components of a lifestyle prescription and motivational factors to improve quality of life and healthspan.

REFERENCES

1. Crowe, Christopher L., et al. “Associations of loneliness and social isolation with health span and life span in the US health and retirement study.” The Journals of Gerontology: Series A76.11 (2021): 1997-2006.
2. Weidema, Bo P., and Peter Fantke. “Relating the Global Burden of Disease to life cycles.” Procedia CIRP 69 (2018): 417-422.
3. Dai, Haijiang, et al. “Worldwide Trends in Prevalence, Mortality, and Disability-Adjusted Life Years for Hypertensive Heart Disease From 1990 to 2017.” Hypertension 77.4 (2021): 1223-1233.
4. Kostova, Deliana, Rachel Nugent, and Patricia Richter. “Noncommunicable disease outcomes and the effects of vertical and horizontal health aid.” Economics & Human Biology 41 (2021): 100935.
5. Baden, Megu Y., et al. “Changes in plant-based diet quality and health-related quality of life in women.” British Journal of Nutrition 124.9 (2020): 960-970.

Saturday, September 17
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
6:00 am – 8:00 am BREAKFAST - - - - -
8:00 am – 9:00 am Session 2 - Translational Research between Diet and Dementia Ayesha Sherzai, MD
Dean Sherzai, MD, PhD
1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

A summary of the latest research on the profound effects of nutrition on brain health. Dr.‘s Sherzai will review their own novel research as well as the most current research that describes the associations between diet and dementia. They will demonstrate the genesis events in the development of dementia and data supported recommendations of the optimal lifestyle interventions to prevent and support dementia and other cognitive conditions.

OBJECTIVES

1. To assess the epidemiology of Alzheimer’s
2. To interpret the relationship of genes and Alzheimer’s
3. To recognize the myths around brain health and dementia
4. To determine the relationship between nutrition and brain health and Alzheimer’s.

REFERENCES

1. Flanagan, E., Lamport, D., Brennan, L., Burnet, P., Calabrese, V., Cunnane, S. C., … & Vauzour, D. (2020). Nutrition and the ageing brain: Moving towards clinical applications. Ageing Research Reviews, 62, 101079.
2. Bianchi, V. E., Herrera, P. F., & Laura, R. (2021). Effect of nutrition on neurodegenerative diseases. A systematic review. Nutritional neuroscience, 24(10), 810-834.
3. Sherzai, D., & Sherzai, A. (2019). Preventing Alzheimer’s: Our most urgent health care priority. American journal of lifestyle medicine, 13(5), 451-461.

9:00 am – 10:00 am Session 3 - The Role of Diet in Acne Apple Bodemer, MD 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

This talk will cover the role diet plays in the development of acne. I will dive into the biochemical pathways that lead to acne and focus on how the foods we eat impact those pathways. I will also cover the epidemiological studies that help us understand how those biochemical pathways translate into potential clinical impact.

OBJECTIVES

1. Recognize important biochemical pathways involved in the development and promotion of acne
2. Identify dietary patterns that promote acne
3. Prescribe dietary interventions for patients with acne

REFERENCES

1. Baldwin H, Tan J. Effects of Diet on Acne and Its Response to Treatment [published correction appears in Am J Clin Dermatol. 2020 Dec 26;:]. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2021;22(1):55-65. doi:10.1007/s40257-020-00542-y
2. Penso L, Touvier M, Deschasaux M, Szabo de Edelenyi F, Hercberg S, Ezzedine K, Sbidian E. Association Between Adult Acne and Dietary Behaviors: Findings From the NutriNet-Santé Prospective Cohort Study. JAMA Dermatol. 2020 Aug 1;156(8):854-862. doi: 10.1001/jamadermatol.2020.1602. PMID: 32520303; PMCID: PMC7287950.
3. Barrea L, Donnarumma M, Cacciapuoti S, Muscogiuri G, De Gregorio L, Blasio C, Savastano S, Colao A, Fabbrocini G. Phase angle and Mediterranean diet in patients with acne: Two easy tools for assessing the clinical severity of disease. J Transl Med. 2021 Apr 26;19(1):171. doi: 10.1186/s12967-021-02826-1. PMID: 33902622; PMCID: PMC8074493.

10:00 am – 10:30 am Break - - - - -
10:30 am – 11:30 am Session 4 – Understanding Lipids Monica Aggarwal, MD, FACC 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

Will discuss the course of heart disease and the impact of lipids. Will talk about the years of poor lipids being more impactful than one moment in time. Will talk about primary and secondary prevention management for lipids. We talk about different atherogenic particles to consider. Will talk about how medications and diet work. Will discuss some of the misinformation that is in the public prevue regarding lipids/atherogenesis and optimal care.

OBJECTIVES

1. Analyze lipid physiology and the impact of lipids on heart disease
2. Recognize the different atherogenic particles and which ones are important to follow
3. Interpret the impact of medications and lifestyle impact lipids and risk of heart disease.

REFERENCES

1. Arnett DK, Blumenthal RS, Albert MA, Buroker AB, Goldberger ZD, Hahn EJ, Himmelfarb CD, Khera A, Lloyd-Jones D, McEvoy JW, Michos ED. 2019 ACC/AHA guideline on the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines. Circulation. 2019 Sep 10;140(11):e596-646.
2. Wilson PW, Jacobson TA, Martin SS, Jackson EJ, Le NA, Davidson MH, Vesper HW, Frikke-Schmidt R, Ballantyne CM, Remaley AT. Lipid measurements in the management of cardiovascular diseases: Practical recommendations a scientific statement from the national lipid association writing group. Journal of clinical lipidology. 2021 Sep 1;15(5):629-48.
3. Wilson DP, Koschinsky ML, Moriarty PM. Expert position statements: comparison of recommendations for the care of adults and youth with elevated lipoprotein (a). Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity. 2021 Apr 1;28(2):159-73.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm Session 5 - The Practice Management Side of Passionate, Purposeful and Profitable Plant-based Private Practices Melissa Mondala, MD, MHA, MS 1 1 1 0

SUMMARY

Many healthcare providers are burned out from fragmented healthcare systems that focus on disease rather than finding solutions to prevent disease and deescalating medications. Healthcare providers who practice passionate care have reported increased provider and patient satisfaction. There are various health care practices that have shown to demonstrate positive health outcomes not only through value-based care but also plant-based nutrition therapies. Amongst a pandemic, direct primary & lifestyle care and multispecialty and interdisciplinary telehealth has served to provide greater access, cost-effectiveness, improved continuity & comprehensive visits, and positive patient outcomes.

OBJECTIVES

1. Assess best practices from various healthcare systems offering plant-based nutrition/Lifestyle Medicine concepts and solutions.
2. Examine new and innovative ways to use telemedicine as part of a Direct Primary/Specialty Care practice.
3. Construct strategies for treating patients using lifestyle medicine/plant based nutrition that increase patient outcome and satisfaction while simultaneously increasing provider satisfaction.
4. Develop various strategies to implement/improve practice strategies, effective clinic flow and ways to bring visibility/credibility to your practice.

REFERENCES

1. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34651142/
2. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34646107/
3. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27626113/
4. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31105486/
5. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34770148/
6. https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/circj/84/3/84_CJ-20-0058/_pdf/-char/en

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm LUNCH - - - - -
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Session 6 - Nutrition and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Hana Kahleova, MD, PhD, MBA 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

Nutrition plays a key role in the prevention and treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). One in three adults in the US has NAFLD and nutrition is the #1 causal treatment option. In addition to weight management, diet composition is critical. A Western diet contributes to NAFLD by providing excess calories, particularly in the form of excess fat and sugar. Fat quality plays a major role. Saturated fat contributes to increased liver fat much more readily than polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat. A plant-based diet significantly reduces liver fat. In a 16-week randomized clinical trial, a low-fat vegan diet reduced liver fat by 34%. A plant-based diet also addresses the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, including insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and inflammation. In addition to diet composition, intermittent fasting is a novel strategy to reduce liver fat, and to improve markers of cardiometabolic health at the same time.

OBJECTIVES

1. To analyze the dietary factors that contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
2. To examine the dietary interventions that may be used in the treatment.
3. To evaluate the benefits of a plant-based diet and intermittent fasting.

REFERENCES

1. Cotter TG, Rinella M. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease 2020: The State of the Disease. Gastroenterology. 2020 May;158(7):1851-1864. doi: 10.1053/j.gastro.2020.01.052. Epub 2020 Feb 13. PMID: 32061595.
2. Rosqvist F, Iggman D, Kullberg J, Cedernaes J, Johansson HE, Larsson A, Johansson L, Ahlström H, Arner P, Dahlman I, Risérus U. Overfeeding polyunsaturated and saturated fat causes distinct effects on liver and visceral fat accumulation in humans. Diabetes. 2014 Jul;63(7):2356-68. doi: 10.2337/db13-1622. Epub 2014 Feb 18. PMID: 24550191.
3. Petersen KF, Dufour S, Befroy D, Lehrke M, Hendler RE, Shulman GI. Reversal of nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis, hepatic insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia by moderate weight reduction in patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes. 2005 Mar;54(3):603-8. doi: 10.2337/diabetes.54.3.603. PMID: 15734833; PMCID: PMC2995496.
4. Kahleova H, Petersen KF, Shulman GI, Alwarith J, Rembert E, Tura A, Hill M, Holubkov R, Barnard ND. Effect of a Low-Fat Vegan Diet on Body Weight, Insulin Sensitivity, Postprandial Metabolism, and Intramyocellular and Hepatocellular Lipid Levels in Overweight Adults: A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Netw Open. 2020 Nov 2;3(11):e2025454. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.25454. Erratum in: JAMA Netw Open. 2021 Jan 4;4(1):e2035088. Erratum in: JAMA Netw Open. 2021 Feb 1;4(2):e210550. Erratum in: JAMA Netw Open. 2021 May 3;4(5):e2115510. PMID: 33252690; PMCID: PMC7705596.
5. Kahleova H, Belinova L, Malinska H, Oliyarnyk O, Trnovska J, Skop V, Kazdova L, Dezortova M, Hajek M, Tura A, Hill M, Pelikanova T. Eating two larger meals a day (breakfast and lunch) is more effective than six smaller meals in a reduced-energy regimen for patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomised crossover study. Diabetologia. 2014 Aug;57(8):1552-60. doi: 10.1007/s00125-014-3253-5. Epub 2014 May 18. Erratum in: Diabetologia. 2015 Jan;58(1):205. PMID: 24838678; PMCID: PMC4079942.

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Session 7 – The Year in Plants: The Most Important Studies You Might Have Missed in 2022 Andrew M. Freeman, MD 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

In this review of the last year or so, Dr. Freeman will explore data in the plant based and prevention research space and enlighten the audience of the power of plant-based nutrition and disease prevention and treatment.

OBJECTIVES

1. Analyze the latest research on how nutrition affects health outcomes
2. Demonstrate the basic lifestyle components in the prevention of cardiovascular disease
3. Analyze and interpret studies and statistics for various disease states.

REFERENCES

1. Virani SS, et al. Heart disease and stroke statistics-2021 update: a report from the American Heart Association [published online ahead of print January 27, 2021]. Circulation. doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000000950
2. CDC https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db397-H.pdf
3. Choi Y, Larson N, Steffen LM, et al. Plant-centered diet and risk of incident cardiovascular disease during young to middle adulthood. J Am Heart Assoc. 2021;e020718. doi: 10.1161/JAHA.120.020718

4:00 pm – 4:45 pm Break - - - - -
4:45 pm – 5:45 pm Session 8 - Origins and Impact of Food Addiction Eric Walsh, MD, DrPH 1 1 1 0

Summary:

There is ongoing debate over whether or not food addiction actually exists.
Some argue that it is more likely bad habits formed around how people
consume food. However, research supports the idea that neuro-chemical
processes drive unwanted behaviors towards food. In this talk we address
the origins of food addiction from the before prenatal period into early
childhood and beyond. How does food addiction occur? Who benefits from
it? and how can it be reversed? Affinity for flavors and hence foods begin
preconception and are strengthened in utero. Understanding how infants
are fed is key to reversing the trends of a food addicted society.

Learning Objectives:

Learning Objective 1 Evaluate recent studies that describe the impact of preconception and early
life nutrition on food preferences and demonstrate the connection to later
life disease.

Learning Objective 2 Demonstrate the neural chemical process by which Chemical addiction
happens and apply these principles to food addiction.

Learning Objective 3 Provide strategies for reversing food addiction and develop a broader plan
to prevent food addiction in society.

References:

Presentation Reference 1 Beverly Sara Mühlhäusler, Clare L. Adam & I. Caroline McMillen (2008)
Maternal nutrition and the programming of obesity, Organogenesis, 4:3, 144-152, DOI: 10.4161/org.4.3.6503

Presentation Reference 2 Volkow, N., Wise, R. & Baler, R. The dopamine motive system: implications
for drug and food addiction. Nat Rev Neurosci 18, 741-752 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1038/nrn.2017.130

Presentation Reference 3 Blumenthal, Daniel Ma; Gold, Mark Sb. Neurobiology of food addiction.
Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition and Metabolic Care: July 2010 – Volume 13 – Issue 4 – p 359-365
doi: 10.1097/MCO.0b013e32833ad4d4

Additional References (Optional) Wei NL, Quan ZF, Zhao T, Yu XD, Xie Q, Zeng J, Ma FK, Wang F, Tang

QS, Wu H, Zhu JH. Chronic stress increases susceptibility to food addiction by increasing the levels of DR2 and MOR in the nucleus accumbens. Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat. 2019 May 8;15:1211-1229. doi: 10.2147/NDT.S204818. PMID: 31190828; PMCID: PMC6512647.

5:45 pm – 7:30 pm DINNER - - - - -
Sunday, September 18
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
6:00 am – 8:00 am BREAKFAST - - - - -
8:00 am – 9:00 am Session 9 - A Carrot and a Stent - You Pick! Koushik R. Reddy, MD 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

Despite fascinating advances in cardiovascular medicine, heart disease continues to be the leading cause of death across the world. A vast majority of disease burden, morbidity, and mortality are preventable through the practice healthy lifestyle. This presentation will cover the scope of current cardiovascular disease burden and outline the evidence in support of various lifestyle strategies to prevent and treat the leading cause of death.

OBJECTIVES

1. Recognize the current scope and burden of cardiovascular disease.
2. Examine the data in support of various lifestyle strategies to prevent heart disease.
3. Develop and recommend healthy dietary and lifestyle strategies in day-to-day clinical practice.

REFERENCES

1. The Global Burden of Cardiovascular Diseases and Risks: A Compass for Global Action https://www.jacc.org/doi/10.1016/j.jacc.2020.11.021
2. Lifestyle Medicine and the Management of Cardiovascular Disease https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28980137/
3. Cardiovascular Disease and Lifestyle Medicine https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35389845/

9:00 am – 10:00 am Session 10 - Plant-based Nutrition for Optimal Performance in Master Athletes Richard M. Rosenfeld, MD, MPH, MBA, DipABLM 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

This presentation will describe the evidence and rationale for using a healthy, whole-food, plant-based diet to support optimal athletic performance, with special considerations for master athletes, who are 40 years of age or older. Topics include comparing plant-based diets to omnivore diets in terms of performance, resilience, recovery, protein quality, and protein bioavailability. The importance of consuming adequate fiber and healthy, complex carbohydrates are emphasized, and evidence is presented regarding the value, or lack thereof, of common supplements that include omega 3, beet root, polyphenols, vitamin E, creatine, and probiotics. Regardless of age or athletic proficiency, all attendees will benefit from a better command and understanding of the evidence on this important topic of increasing relevance to the plant-based nutrition movement.

OBJECTIVES

1. Evaluate the evidence supporting plant-based diets as comparable to omnivore diets for athletic performance, resilience, and recovery
2. Recognize the macronutrient needs for athletes, including older master athletes, especially regarding plant vs. animal protein and carbohydrate quality and quantity
3. Recognize dietary supplements for plant-based athletes that are essential for health and/or may boost performance.

REFERENCES

1. Boutros GH, Landry-Duval MA, Garzon M, Karelis AD. Is a vegan diet detrimental to endurance and muscle strength? Eur J Clin Nutr. 2020 Nov;74(11):1550-1555. doi: 10.1038/s41430-020-0639-y. Epub 2020 Apr 24.
2. Lim MT, Pan BJ, Toh DWK, Sutanto CN, Kim JE. Animal Protein versus Plant Protein in Supporting Lean Mass and Muscle Strength: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Nutrients. 2021 Feb 18;13(2):661. doi: 10.3390/nu13020661.
3. Lonnie M, Laurie I, Myers M, Horgan G, Russell WR, Johnstone AM. Exploring Health-Promoting Attributes of Plant Proteins as a Functional Ingredient for the Food Sector: A Systematic Review of Human Interventional Studies. Nutrients. 2020 Jul 30;12(8):2291. doi: 10.3390/nu12082291.
4. Rickards L, Lynn A, Harrop D, Barker ME, Russell M, Ranchordas MK. Effect of Polyphenol-Rich Foods, Juices, and Concentrates on Recovery from Exercise Induced Muscle Damage: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Nutrients. 2021 Aug 27;13(9):2988. doi: 10.3390/nu13092988.
5. Rosenfeld RM, Kelly JH, Sannidhi DV, et al. American College of Lifestyle Medicine (ACLM) expert consensus statement: dietary interventions to treat type 2 diabetes in adults with a goal of remission. Amer J Lifestyle Med 2022; May; epub ahead of print, doi:10.1177/15598276221087624.

10:00 am – 10:30 am Break - - - - -
10:30 am – 11:30 am Session 11 - Questioning Why We Think Protein Matters So Much T. Colin Campbell, PhD 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

Consciously or subconsciously, almost everyone believes that animal-based protein is essential for human health. This is incorrect and the scientific evidence is indisputable. This belief, almost two centuries old, has driven dietary choice more than any other dietary consideration. This blind spot, or nutritional ignorance, specific to the topic of protein created the environment for our current medical understanding and lack of nutritional intervention for the non-communicable disease burden. This presentation will engage these concepts and discuss their importance for reasons other than ethics.

OBJECTIVES

1. Recognize three flaws in the hypothesis for plant-based nutrition.
2. Demonstrate how a historical missing link of nutritional science created persistent confusion surrounding protein needs and its role in the treatment of lifestyle diseases today.
3. Analyze how and why food and health policy is so contentious and interpret its effect on the health of patients and communities.

REFERENCES

1. Naghshi, Sina, et al. “Dietary intake of total, animal, and plant proteins and risk of all cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality: Systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.” bmj 370 (2020).
2. Pajari, Anne-Maria, et al. “Effects of replacing dietary animal protein with plant-based protein on the formation of intestinal N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) and biomarkers of colon cancer in healthy adults-a 12-week intervention study.” (2019): 965-965.
3. González, Frank, et al. “Inflammation triggered by saturated fat ingestion is linked to insulin resistance and hyperandrogenism in polycystic ovary syndrome.” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 105.6 (2020): e2152-e2167.
4. Jabri, Ahmad, et al. “Meta-analysis of effect of vegetarian diet on ischemic heart disease and all-cause mortality.” American Journal of Preventive Cardiology 7 (2021): 100182.

11:30 am – 12:30 pm Session 12 - Train Them Up: Lifestyle Medicine in Children to Achieve Health Equity David Bowman, MD 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

Pregnancy, the neonatal period, and early childhood represent opportunities to set a child’s future health outcomes for the positive. However, adverse childhood experiences and health inequities may jeopardize the health of the child and impact adult health as well. In this presentation, we will discuss the importance of preventing and mitigating adverse childhood experiences, the importance of starting ideal health behaviors in early childhood, and how starting lifestyle medicine in children may be an optimal way to achieve health equity.

OBJECTIVES

1. Evaluate the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and childhood disease.
2. Demonstrate the importance of starting ideal lifestyle behaviors in early childhood.
3. Examine how starting lifestyle medicine in children might be an optimal way to achieve health equity

REFERENCES

1. Black, M. M., Trude, A., & Lutter, C. K. (2020). All Children Thrive: Integration of Nutrition and Early Childhood Development. Annual review of nutrition, 40, 375-406. https://doi-org.proxyhu.wrlc.org/10.1146/annurev-nutr-120219-023757
2. Cassoobhoy, A., Sardana, J. J., Benigas, S., Tips, J., & Kees, A. (2021). Building Health Equity: Action Steps From the American College of Lifestyle Medicine’s Health Disparities Solutions Summit (HDSS) 2020. American journal of lifestyle medicine, 16(1), 61-75. https://doi.org/10.1177/15598276211052248
3. Robinette, L. M., Hatsu, I. E., Johnstone, J. M., Tost, G., Bruton, A. M., Leung, B., Odei, J. B., Orchard, T., Gracious, B. L., & Arnold, L. E. (2022). Fruit and vegetable intake is inversely associated with severity of inattention in a pediatric population with ADHD symptoms: the MADDY Study. Nutritional neuroscience, 1-10. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/1028415×.2022.2071805

12:30 pm – 2:00 pm LUNCH - - - - -
2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Session 13 - The Breast Defense: How to Minimize Cancer Risk Kristi Funk, MD, FACS 0 0 0 0

SUMMARY

Breast cancer is one of the most feared diseases in the world. But did you know that only 5-10 percent of all breast cancer comes from an inherited gene mutation? That’s right. Up to 90 percent of cancer results from the dietary and lifestyle choices we make every single day – not genetics. Dr. Kristi Funk, noted breast cancer surgeon and women’s health warrior at pinklotus.com, dispels common misconceptions about breast cancer and presents evidence-based nutrition and lifestyle secrets to living your healthiest life. Come listen as complex concepts get distilled into simple, actionable, take-it-home and start-right-now power.

Join Dr. Kristi Funk to learn about the critical importance of IGF-1, antioxidants, obesity, exercise, and other exposures that exert a dramatic effect on one’s cancer-kicking capacity. Find out what thousands of medical studies have revealed about the simple choices you and your patients can make to slash the risk of cancer.

OBJECTIVES

1. Demonstrate four risk factors for breast cancer that are under a person’s control.
2. Recognize three ways that diet affects a tumor cell’s microenvironment.
3. Evaluate techniques, lifestyle habits and resources Name three resources you can share with others to help them reduce their cancer risk.

REFERENCES

1. G.E.Fraser, et al. International Journal of Epidemiology, 49, no. 5, (2020), 1526-37. M. E. Levine et al., Cell Metabolism 19, no. 3 (2014): 407-17.
2. Y. Tantamango-Bartley et al., “Vegetarian Diets and the Incidence of Cancer in a Low-Risk Population,” Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention Biomarkers (2012): cebp-1060.
3. R. J. Barnard et al., Nutrition and Cancer 55, no. 1 (2006): 28-34.
4. M. Harvie et al., Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention 14, no. 3 (March 2005): 656-61.

3:00 pm – 3:30 pm Break - - - - -
3:30 pm – 4:30 pm Session 14 - A Unifying Theory of Lifestyle Medicine Dean Ornish, MD 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

This presentation will explain why a whole foods plant-based diet, moderate exercise, stress management techniques, and love/social support are so beneficial in treating and preventing a wide variety of chronic diseases. They share common biological mechanisms which, in turn, are directly influenced to what we eat, how we respond to stress, how much exercise we have, and how much love and social support we experience. The health policy implications of this will also be explored.

OBJECTIVES

1. To be able to recognize and interpret the biological mechanisms common to many chronic diseases.
2. To be able to recognize and interpret how diet and lifestyle choices affect each of these biological mechanisms-for better and for worse.
3. To analyze the hypothesis of why these lifestyle changes may stop or reverse the progression of early-stage Alzheimer’s disease and the randomized, controlled clinical trial in progress to test this hypothesis.

REFERENCES

1. Dixon M, Ornish D. Love in the time of COVID-19: Social prescribing and the paradox of isolation. Future Healthc J. 2021 Mar;8(1):53-56. doi: 10.7861/fhj.2021-0009.
2. Ornish D, Redberg R. PCI Guided by Fractional Flow Reserve at 5 Years. N Engl J Med. 2019 Jan 3;380(1):103-104. doi: 10.1056/NEJMc1813100.
3. Aggarwal M, Ornish D, Josephson R, et al. Closing Gaps in Lifestyle Adherence for Secondary Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease. Am J Cardiol. 2021 Apr 15;145:1-11. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2021.01.005.
4. Freeman AM, Taub PR, Lo HC, Ornish D. Intensive Cardiac Rehabilitation: an Underutilized Resource. Curr Cardiol Rep. 2019 Mar 4;21(4):19. doi: 10.1007/s11886-019-1104-1.

4:30 pm – 5:30 pm Session 15 - Intersection of Food, Pain and Regeneration Stephan Esser, MD 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

Food is a universal human behavior with extensive variability in the human species and experience. At the cellular level, food alters genetic expression, influences aging, inflammation and disease risk for cardiometabolic, orthopedic and neurologic systems. In this presentation you will learn the primary intersections of food, pain and general health and strategies to apply pain altering nutritional interventions to your clinical practice.

OBJECTIVES

1. Participants will be able to recognize 5 primary mechanisms by which food alters cellular inflammation, perfusion and pain generation.
2. Participants will determine 4 intersections between food and common conditions including osteoarthritis, tendon injuries, neuropathic pain and spondylosis.
3. Participants will develop 4 tangible science based nutritional interventions to reduce pain in their patients.

REFERENCES

1. Effects of dietary patterns on biomarkers of inflammation and immune responses: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Advances in Nutrition 2022
2. Association Between Abdominal Aortic Calcification, Bone Mineral Density, and Fracture in Older Women Lewis, J. JBPMR 2019
3. Association of Hypertension with Knee Pain Severity Among People with Knee Osteoarthritis 2022
4. The effect of dietary anthocyanins on biochemical, physiological, and subjective exercise recovery: a systematic review and meta-analysis 2021

5:30 pm – 7:15 pm DINNER - - - - -
7:15 pm – 9:15 pm Session 16 - Luminary Panel: A Historical and Visionary Perspective on Ten Years of Research with the Pioneers of WFPBN Scott Stoll, MD, FABPMR
Neal D. Barnard, MD, FACC
T. Colin Campbell, PhD
Brenda Davis, RD
Hans Diehl, DrHSc, MPH, FACN
Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr., MD
Michael Klaper, MD
Dean Ornish, MD
2 2 2 2

SUMMARY

This presentation is an interactive, moderated panel conversation with the key experts in the field of whole food plant based nutrition and lifestyle medicine. The panel will explore the evidence for lifestyle disease suspension and remission, biologic mechanisms of disease formation and progression, key intervention trials and discussion of the body of research to date, identification of the factors that motivate and sustain behavioral change, and recommendations for healthcare for individual healthcare providers and healthcare organizations to incorporate a food and lifestyle as medicine approach to patient care.

OBJECTIVES

1. Assess the underlying mechanisms and sites of injury that lead to the formation of lifestyle related diseases.
2. Determine the most important steps and components of a lifestyle prescription that lead to sustainable behavior change.
3. Analyze the body of research and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the whole food plant based research to date.
4. Recognize the historical origins of lifestyle related diseases and the changes in treatments/recommendations that have occurred in the last 10 years that are improving patient outcomes.

REFERENCES

1. Rigi, Somaye, et al. “The association between plant-based dietary patterns and risk of breast cancer: A case-control study.” Scientific Reports 11.1 (2021): 1-10.
2. Szabo, Zoltan, et al. “Possible Biochemical Processes Underlying the Positive Health Effects of Plant-Based Diets-A Narrative Review.” Nutrients 13.8 (2021): 2593.
3. Couto, Mafalda R., et al. “Microbiota-derived butyrate regulates intestinal inflammation: Focus on inflammatory bowel disease.” Pharmacological Research 159 (2020): 104947.
4. \Baden, Megu Y., et al. “Changes in Plant-Based Diet Quality and Total and Cause-Specific Mortality.” Circulation (2019).
5. Poore, Joseph, and Thomas Nemecek. “Reducing food’s environmental impacts through producers and consumers.” Science 360.6392 (2018): 987-992.

Monday, September 19
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
6:00 am – 8:00 am BREAKFAST - - - - -
8:00 am – 9:00 am Session 17 - The Science of Behavior Change: How to Influence People to Change Their DIETS! Ocean Robbins 1 1 1 0

SUMMARY

Despite all the breakthroughs in nutritional science, rates of obesity, Alzheimer’s, and diabetes continue to rise, heart disease is still the world’s #1 killer, and the war on cancer has turned into something of a costly stalemate. What’s the missing piece? It’s 2022, and we have generations of research behind us, so why did 11 million people, according to the Global Burden of Disease report, die last year from diseases that were fueled by diet and lifestyle? And more importantly – what can we do about it?! Join bestselling author and “food revolution” leader Ocean Robbins to learn about the neuroscience of habit change, the root sources of human motivation, the right use of willpower, how to be a positive influence on the food choices of patients (and family members!), and what it’s going to take to reverse the chronic disease epidemic in our lifetimes.

OBJECTIVES

1. Demonstrate the neuroscience of habit change.
2. Distinguish between differing individual motivations at various stages of life.
3. Develop methods of positively influencing the food choices of patients, friends, and family
4. Examine the root sources of human motivation and demonstrate how to effectively utilize willpower

REFERENCES

1. https://today.yougov.com/topics/consumer/articles-reports/2020/01/23/millennials-diet-climate-change-environment-poll
2. https://neurosciencenews.com/diet-life-expectancy-20044/
3. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/344351891_The_Impact_of_Mothers’_Dietary_Patterns_on_Children’s_Nutritional_Status_in_China
4. https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2019/friends-influence-eating-habits.html

9:00 am – 10:00 am Session 18 - Getting It Right: Plant-based Nutrition From Birth Through the Senior Years Brenda Davis, RD 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

In this presentation, Brenda Davis, RD, will review the current literature regarding the nutritional adequacy of plant-based diets, including 100% plant-based diets at every stage of the lifecycle. She will address the nutrients of special interest for those eating plant-based diets, including protein, iron, zinc, vitamin B12, calcium, vitamin D, essential fatty acids, and iodine. Brenda will answer many of the most pressing questions about plant-based eating. Are plant-based diets safe and adequate during childhood? Can we get enough protein from plants? Can plants provide enough iron, zinc, and calcium? Can people who do not eat fish get enough omega-3 fatty acids? Do seniors need to adjust dietary intakes to meet nutritional needs? Brenda provides evidence-based information, practical tools, and reassurance for plant-based practitioners. Well planned plant-based diets not only are appropriate for people at all stages of the lifecycle, they provide impressive advantages for disease risk reduction.

OBJECTIVES

1. Participants will be able to demonstrate at least 5 nutrients that are typically highest in plant-exclusive diets when compared to lacto-ovo vegetarian and nonvegetarian diets.
2. Participants will be able to solve for at least 3 nutrients that commonly fall short in people eating plant-exclusive diets when compared to lacto-ovo vegetarian and nonvegetarian diets.
3. Participants will assess the 3 groups of individuals that may need more protein than the RDA.
4. Recognize at least 3 key sources of zinc in plant-based diets.

REFERENCES

1. Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Vegetarian Diets. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. July 2016;116: 1970-1980.
2. Weder S, Hoffmann M, Becker K, Alexy U, Keller M. Energy, macronutrient intake, and anthropometrics of vegetarian, vegan, and omnivorous children (1-3 years) in Germany (VeChi diet study). Nutrients. 2019;11(4)
3. Alexy U, Fischer M, Weder S, Längler A, Michalsen A, Sputtek A, Keller M. Nutrient Intake and Status of German Children and Adolescents Consuming Vegetarian, Vegan or Omnivore Diets: Results of the VeChi Youth Study. Nutrients. 2021 May 18;13(5):1707.
4. Allès B, Baudry J, Méjean C, et al. Comparison of Sociodemographic and Nutritional Characteristics between Self-Reported Vegetarians, Vegans, and Meat-Eaters from the NutriNet-Santé Study. Nutrients. 2017;9(9):1023. Published 2017 Sep 15. doi:10.3390/nu9091023
5. Rizzo NS, Jaceldo-Siegl K, Sabate J, Fraser GE. Nutrient profiles of vegetarian and nonvegetarian dietary patterns. J Acad Nutr Diet. 2013 Dec;113(12):1610-9.
6. Sobiecki JG, Appleby PN, Bradbury KE, Key TJ. High compliance with dietary recommendations in a cohort of meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Oxford study. Nutr Res. 2016 May;36(5):464-77.
7. Clarys P, Deliens T, Huybrechts I, Deriemaeker P, Vanaelst B, De Keyzer W, Hebbelinck M, Mullie P. Comparison of nutritional quality of the vegan, vegetarian, semi-vegetarian, pesco-vegetarian and omnivorous diet. Nutrients. 2014 Mar 24;6(3):1318-32.
8. Kristensen NB, Madsen ML, Hansen TH, et al. Intake of macro- and micronutrients in Danish vegans [published correction appears in Nutr J. 2016;15:16]. Nutr J. 2015;14:115. Published 2015 Oct 30. doi:10.1186/s12937-015-0103-3
9. Schüpbach R, Wegmüller R, Berguerand C, Bui M, Herter-Aeberli I. Micronutrient status and intake in omnivores, vegetarians and vegans in Switzerland. Eur J Nutr. 2017 Feb;56(1):283-293.
10. Weikert C, Trefflich I, Menzel J, Obeid R, Longree A, Dierkes J, Meyer K, Herter-Aeberli I, Mai K, Stangl GI, Müller SM, Schwerdtle T, Lampen A, Abraham K. Vitamin and Mineral Status in a Vegan Diet. Dtsch Arztebl Int. 2020 Aug 31;117(35-36):575-582.
11. Elorinne AL, Alfthan G, Erlund I, et al. Food and Nutrient Intake and Nutritional Status of Finnish Vegans and Non-Vegetarians [published correction appears in PLoS One. 2016;11(3):e0151296]. PLoS One. 2016;11(2):e0148235. Published 2016 Feb 3.
12. Elliott LJ, Keown-Stoneman CD, Birken CS, Jenkins DJ, Borkhoff CM, Maguire JL. Vegetarian Diet, Growth, and Nutrition in Early Childhood: A Longitudinal Cohort Study. Pediatrics. 2022 May 2.

10:00 am – 10:30 am Break - - - - -
10:30 am – 11:30 am Session 19 - Evidence-Based Weight Loss Michael Greger, MD 1 1 1 1

SUMMARY

What does the science show is the best way to lose weight? Dr. Greger has scoured the world’s scholarly literature and developed this new presentation based on the latest in cutting-edge research based on his new book How Not to Diet. He will touch on the 17 ingredients to the optimal weight loss diet and cover some of the 21 tricks and tweaks for fast-tracking weight loss, which include specific foods that can double as fat blockers and fat burners, starch blockers and appetite suppressants.

OBJECTIVES

1. Recognize three dietary components that may be considered characteristic of an optimal weight loss diet.
2. Analyze the randomized, controlled study that, without caloric restriction or an exercise component, led to the greatest reported weight loss at both 6 and 12 months.
3. Demonstrate that some foods can act as fat blockers, starch blockers, appetite suppressants, and that can counter the metabolic slowing that accompanies weight loss.

REFERENCES

1. Malik VS, Willett WC, Hu FB. The revised nutrition facts label: a step forward and more room for improvement. JAMA. 2016;316(6):583-584.
2. López M. Hypothalamic AMPK: a golden target against obesity? Eur J Endocrinol. 2017;176(5):R235-R246.
3. Daryabeygi-Khotbehsara R, Golzarand M, Ghaffari MP, Djafarian K. Nigella sativa improves glucose homeostasis and serum lipids in type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Complement Ther Med. 2017;35:6-13.

11:30 am – 2:00 pm Session 20 - LUNCH and Panel Discussion: Everyday Ideas for Practice Scott Stoll, MD, FABPMR
Andy Bellatti, MS, RD
Michael Klaper, MD
Michelle Joy Kramer, CHHC, AADP
Melissa Mondala, MD, MHA, MS
2 2 2 2

SUMMARY

S. Stoll, MD, A. Bellatti, RD, M. Klaper, MD, Michelle Joy Kramer, CHHC, AADP and Melissa Mondala, MD, MHA, MS are all part of a guided discussion and Q&A session focused on the application of plant-based nutrition in a clinical setting.

OBJECTIVES

1. Assess the different types of practice models and steps necessary to transition individual practices to include lifestyle medicine interventions.
2. Develop a plan for first steps toward the implementation and/or modification of individual clinical practices.
3. Examine and answer the most common questions regarding the clinical practice of lifestyle medicine and implementation of practical, tested solutions that optimize patient care.
REFERENCES

1. Katz, D. L., et al. “Hierarchies of evidence applied to lifestyle Medicine (HEALM): introduction of a strength-of-evidence approach based on a methodological systematic review.” BMC medical research methodology 19.1 (2019): 178.
2. Egger, Garry. “Defining a structure and methodology for the practice of lifestyle medicine.” American journal of lifestyle medicine 12.5 (2018): 396-403.
3. Bodai, Balazs I., et al. “Lifestyle medicine: A brief review of its dramatic impact on health and survival.” The Permanente Journal 22 (2018).
4. Henderson, Richard C., and Tracie L. Shing. “Characterization of Patients in a Lifestyle Medicine Practice.” American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (2019): 1559827619826543

2:00 pm – 2:15 pm Closing Remarks - - - - -
Friday, September 16
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
9:00 am – 12:00 pm OPTIONAL Workshop 1 - The Practice of Lifestyle Medicine: Clinical and Economic Approaches that Work (SEPARATE REGISTRATION) Wayne Dysinger, MD, MPH 3 3 3 3

SUMMARY

Lifestyle Medicine, with plant-based nutrition as a centerpiece, has always been the right thing to do. But what are the clinical and economic tools that make it viable for health care providers who want to make a full time living practicing Lifestyle Medicine? Dr. Wayne Dysinger, past president of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, has spent the last 7 years practicing and proving out these models. During this engaging workshop, Dr. Dysinger will be sharing a variety of clinical tools that assist health care providers in assessing and treating patients using the Lifestyle Medicine approach. He will also discuss specifics of value based care economic models that are currently available, and that provide an incredibly bright future for any health care providing interested in dedicating their life to Lifestyle Medicine, and getting excellent reimbursement while doing so.

OBJECTIVES

At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to:
1. Utilize specific Lifestyle Medicine focused tools for both assessing and treating patients in a Lifestyle Medicine practice
2. Evaluate the value of group visits, intensive therapeutic lifestyle change programs, and other programs and resources for their Lifestyle Medicine practice
3. Recognize how value based care reimbursement works, and how that reimbursement can be applied to their Lifestyle Medicine practice.

REFERENCES

1. Dysinger W. Lifestyle Medicine Practice: Exploring Workable Models. Am J Lifestyle Med. 2016;10(5):345-347.
2. Frates E, Morris E, Sannidhi D, Dysinger W. The Art and Science of Group Visits in Lifestyle Medicine. Am J Lifestyle Med, Sept, 2017.
3. Donohue D, Dysinger W, Benigas S. Formation of a National Lifestyle Medicine Network to Benefit Patients and Lifestyle Medicine Providers. Am J Lifestyle Medicine. 2019;13(6):548-551.
4. Dysinger W. A Hybrid Value-Based Lifestyle Medicine Practice Model. Am J Lifestyle Med, 2021;15(5).
5. Pathak N, Pollard KJ. Lifestyle medicine prescriptions for personal and planetary health. J of Climate Change and Health. 2021;v4.
6. Lacagnina S, Tips J, Pauly K. Lifestyle Medicine Shared Medical Appointments. Am J Lifestyle Medicine 2020.

9:00 am – 12:00 pm OPTIONAL Workshop 2 - WOMEN’S Health: Hormones, Aging and Other Related Issues (SEPARATE REGISTRATION) Michelle Tollefson, MD 3 3 3 3

SUMMARY

This workshop is designed to explore the current research specific to the optimization of health and physiology for women throughout their lifespan. Topics covered will include reproductive health, hormonal balance, maintenance of bone density, the prevention, suspension, and reversal of chronic diseases, exercise and athletic performance and key strategies utilizing food and lifestyle.

OBJECTIVES

1. Attendees will recognize the impact of nutrition, physical activity, stress management, and sleep prioritization on the menopausal transition.
2. Attendees will recognize how nutrition and other pillars of lifestyle medicine impact the health of women as they age.
3. Attendees will plan opportunities to incorporate lifestyle medicine education into their interactions with their clients/patients.

REFERENCES

1. U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2020-2025. 9th Edition. December 2020. Available at DietaryGuidelines.gov.
2. Piercy KL, Troiano RP, Ballard RM, Carlson SA, Fulton JE, Galuska DA, George SM, Olson RD. The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. JAMA. 2018 Nov 20;320(19):2020-2028. doi: 10.1001/jama.2018.14854. PMID: 30418471.
3. Barnard, Neal D. MD, FACC1,2; Kahleova, Hana MD, PhD1; Holtz, Danielle N. BS1; del Aguila, Fabiola PhD1; Neola, Maggie BS, RD1; Crosby, Lelia M. BA, RD1; Holubkov, Richard PhD3 The Women’s Study for the Alleviation of Vasomotor Symptoms (WAVS): a randomized, controlled trial of a plant-based diet and whole soybeans for postmenopausal women, Menopause: October 2021 – Volume 28 – Issue 10 – p 1150-1156 doi: 10.1097/GME.0000000000001812

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm OPTIONAL Workshop 3 - Pain Free: Food and Regenerative Strategies to Eliminate Pain and Restore Function (SEPARATE REGISTRATION) Stephan Esser, MD
Evan Queler, MD
2 2 2 2

SUMMARY

Pain is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide and the advancement of pain as the fifth vital sign spurred an epidemic of opioid availability and abuse. Traditional healthcare models treat the symptom of pain without necessarily addressing the root causes of pain and the physiologic/anatomic imbalances that contribute to the experience of pain. This workshop will explore the science of pain and inflammation through the intersectional lens of diet, lifestyle, and regenerative medicine to identify clear solutions that alleviate pain through restoration, healing, and regeneration.

OBJECTIVES

1. Asses the root causes of inflammation and pain that are related to diet and lifestyle.
2. Demonstrate the benefits of a regenerative lifestyle medicine approach to general and specific pain conditions.
3. Analyze the evidence for an anti-inflammatory diet and the biochemical pathways of healing that are activated by specific dietary components.

REFERENCES

1. Bolte, Laura A., et al. “Long-term dietary patterns are associated with pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory features of the gut microbiome.” Gut 70.7 (2021): 1287-1298.
2. Schönenberger, Katja A., et al. “Effect of anti-inflammatory diets on pain in rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.” Nutrients 13.12 (2021): 4221.
3. Ansari, Mohammad Yunus, Nashrah Ahmad, and Tariq M. Haqqi. “Oxidative stress and inflammation in osteoarthritis pathogenesis: Role of polyphenols.” Biomedicine & pharmacotherapy 129 (2020): 110452.
4. Dunn, Christopher M., and Matlock A. Jeffries. “The Microbiome in Osteoarthritis: A Narrative Review of Recent Human and Animal Model Literature.” Current Rheumatology Reports (2022): 1-10.
5. Stroemel-Scheder, Cindy, Bernd Kundermann, and Stefan Lautenbacher. “The effects of recovery sleep on pain perception: A systematic review.” Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews 113 (2020): 408-425.

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm OPTIONAL Workshop 4 - MEN’S Health: Hormones, Aging and Other Related Issues (SEPARATE REGISTRATION) Scott Stoll, MD, FABPMR 3 3 3 3

SUMMARY

A whole-foods, plant-based lifestyle approach supports and optimizes Men’s health across the lifespan. Unhealthy dietary and lifestyle choices impact men’s risk for life threatening diseases like heart disease and cancer and reduce quality of life throughout life. Common conditions that have significant relational implications, like erectile dysfunction, are directly related to dietary and lifestyle choices. During this interactive workshop, attendees will learn about body of evidence demonstrating how lifestyle and a whole food plant based lifestyle can prevent, suspend, and reverse many common lifestyle related diseases and dramatically improve quality of life. They will also have the opportunity to learn key fitness interventions that optimize musculoskeletal health, recommendations for optimizing brain function with aging, and the importance of minimizing toxin exposures.

OBJECTIVES

1. Participants will be able to interpret the core components of a lifestyle prescription for men of any age.
2. Participants will be able to recognize the primary cause of erectile dysfunction and prescribe evidenced based solutions for their patients.
3. Participants will recognize the benefits of a WFPB diet and it’s impact on men’s health through the aging process.

REFERENCES

1. Carto, Chase, et al. “Consumption of a healthy plant-based diet is associated with a decreased risk of erectile dysfunction: a cross-sectional study of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.” Urology 161 (2022): 76-82.
2. Babcock, Matthew C., et al. “Oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with age-related endothelial dysfunction in men with low testosterone.” The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism 107.2 (2022): e500-e514.
3. Lopes, L. Seligra, et al. “Do statins cause testosterone deficiency in men? Systematic review and meta analysis.” The Journal of Sexual Medicine 19.5 (2022): S150.
4. Kim, Hyunju, et al. “Plant‐based diets are associated with a lower risk of incident cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular disease mortality, and all‐cause mortality in a general population of middle‐aged adults.” Journal of the American Heart Association 8.16 (2019): e012865.
5. Shivalingaiah, Sushmitha Basavapattana, et al. “Sleep and gonadotrophin hormones.” International Journal of Nutrition, Pharmacology, Neurological Diseases 11.1 (2021): 17.
6. Kiwitt-Cárdenas, Jonathan, et al. “Sugar-sweetened beverage intake in relation to reproductive parameters in young men.” Revista Internacional de Andrología (2022).

  • Agenda subject to change.
    ++ NUMBER OF CREDITS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.