2020 PBNHC Agenda* (ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN STANDARD TIMES)

Friday, September 11
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
3:40 pm – 4:00 pm Welcome Remarks Scott Stoll, MD - - - -
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Keynote Address...The Power of the Plate: The Science of Regeneration and Sustainability Scott Stoll, MD 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Session 2 - Diabetes Michelle McMacken, MD 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Break - - - - -
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Session 3 - Alzheimer and Dementia Dean Ornish, MD 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Session 4 - Orthopedics Thomas D. Rosenberg, MD 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

Saturday, September 12
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Session 5 - Cancer Shireen Kassam MBBS, FRCPath, PhD 1 1 1 1

Summary:

This talk will summarize data on the role of diet and nutrition for cancer prevention and treatment. In addition to summarizing international recommendations, the talk will highlight recent studies and evidence, which lend further support for predominately plant-based diets and provide data on novel mechanisms by which diet can impact all aspects of cancer development.

Learning Objectives:

1. To evaluate and asses the current recommendations on diet and nutrition for cancer prevention.
2. Examine and interpret recent studies that support plant-based nutrition for all aspects of cancer development and novel mechanisms of action.
3. Asses the role a predominately plant-based diet has in reducing cancer risk in patients.
4. Utilize international recommendations to provide dietary interventions recommendations for patients with cancer at diagnosis, during treatment and through survivorship.
5. Describe and demonstrate novel mechanisms by which plant-based diets may benefit all stages of cancer development.

References:

1. World Cancer Research Fund & American Institute for Cancer Research. Diet, nutrition, physical activity and cancer: a global perspective (WCRF International, 2018). The 2018 Third Expert Report provides an update and comprehensive review of the literature on diet and cancer.
2. Steck, S.E., Murphy, E.A. Dietary patterns and cancer risk. Nat Rev Cancer (2019). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41568-019-0227-4

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Session 6 - The Pleasure Trap: Mastering the Hidden Force that Undermines Health and Happiness Doug Lisle, PhD 1 1 1 1

Summary:

This presentation explains why making healthy diet and lifestyles choices is inherently difficult. A biological approach to understanding motivation has helped to illuminate the nature of these challenges and point the way to more effective change strategies.

Learning Objectives:

1. Demonstrate how to identify the three major biological foundations of motivation, and how they influence diet and lifestyle choices (e.g., the “motivational triad” of pleasure-seeking, pain-avoidance, and energy conversation).
2. Examine the details of the chemical processes that lead to addictive-like behaviors with modern foods (supernormal foods stoke hyperactivate the dopamine pathway).
3. Analyze and recommend three clinical techniques that can assist in recovering taste sensitivity and healthy dietary motivation (one-day fasting, juice fasting, and extended water-fasting).

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Break - - - - -
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Session 7 - Fiber Will Bulsiewicz, MD, MSCI 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Session 8 - What We Know, What We Don't Know, What We Need to Know T. Colin Campbell, PhD 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Break - - - - -
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Session 9 - Essentials of Practical Application of Plant Based Nutrition in Clinical Practice Robert Ostfeld, MD, MSc, FACC 1 1 1 1

Summary:

How can a busy practitioner implement important lifestyle interventions in daily clinical practice? Dr. Rob Ostfeld, an award winning academic and clinical cardiologist, will share the strategies and tools that he has developed to help patients implement a whole food plant based dietary lifestyle. Dr. Ostfeld will also review the outcome data from research studies in his lifestyle medicine cardiovascular clinic. The presentation will also focus on the science of behavior change and key elements of coaching that are critical when working with patients to create sustainable, lasting lifestyle changes. Finally, Dr. Ostfeld will describe strategies to assist plant-based and lifestyle medicine practitioners in the development of productive working relationships with hospital administrators in order to create and implement new programs.

Learning Objectives:

1. Recognize the proven, successful strategies for assisting patients with behavioral change and implementing new programs within hospital systems.
2. Determine the most important programmatic changes that can be implemented with the least resistance and produce the greatest change.
3. Design a plan for implementing a plant based/lifestyle medicine program with identifiable and achievable steps.

References:

1. Bus, Kathryn, et al. “Comparison of in-person and online motivational interviewing–based health coaching.” Health promotion practice 19.4 (2018): 513-521.
2. Lancha Jr, Antonio Herbert, Gary A. Sforzo, and Luciana Oquendo Pereira-Lancha. “Improving nutritional habits with no diet prescription: details of a nutritional coaching process.” American journal of lifestyle medicine 12.2 (2018): 160-165.
3. Dayan, Paula Helena, et al. “A new clinical perspective: Treating obesity with nutritional coaching versus energy-restricted diets.” Nutrition 60 (2019): 147-151.
4. Jackson, Kelley, Deborah D’Avolio, and Sareen Gropper. “Choosing coaching frameworks for promoting diet modifications.” British Journal of Nursing 28.22 (2019): 1456-1460.

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Session 10 - Long-term Health Effects of Vegetarian Diets – Evidence From the Tzu Chi Cohorts Tina H. T. Chiu, PhD, RD, MPH 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

Learning Objectives:

1. Learners will understand the latest update on the prospective outcomes on how vegetarian diets affect long term health outcomes on stroke, diabetes, gout, gallstone, and other disease from the Tzu Chi Health Study.
2. Learners will be updated on the current knowledge on the health impacts of vegetarian diet on chronic diseases from other prospective cohorts and randomized controlled trials.
3. Learners will understand the consistency and discrepancy in different studies, possible reasons to explain the findings, potential mechanisms, and application in clinical practices.

Sunday, September 13
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Session 11 - Plant-based Diet's Role in Preventing and Treating Inflammatory Bowel Disease Alan Desmond, MD 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Session 12 - How Not to Diet: Evidence-Based Weight Loss Michael Greger, MD 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

What does the science show is the best way to lose weight? Dr. Greger has scoured the world’s scholarly literature and developed this new presentation based on the latest in cutting-edge research based on his new book How Not to Diet. He will touch on the 17 ingredients to the optimal weight loss diet and cover some of the 2 tricks and tweaks for fast-tracking weight loss, which include specific foods that can double as fat blockers and fat burners, starch blockers and appetite suppressants.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

1) Name three dietary components that may be considered characteristic of an optimal weight loss diet.
2) Detail the randomized, controlled study that, without caloric restriction or an exercise component, led to the greatest reported weight loss at both 6 and 12 months.
3) Name the foods that can act as fat blockers, starch blockers, appetite suppressants, and that can counter the metabolic slowing that accompanies weight loss

REFERENCES:

1) Hall KD, Ayuketah A, Brychta R, et al. Ultra-Processed Diets Cause Excess Calorie Intake and Weight Gain: An Inpatient Randomized Controlled Trial of Ad Libitum Food Intake. Cell Metab. 2019
2) Smethers AD, Rolls BJ. Dietary Management of Obesity: Cornerstones of Healthy Eating Patterns. Med Clin North Am. 2018;102(1):107-124.
3) López M. Hypothalamic AMPK: a golden target against obesity? Eur J Endocrinol. 2017;176(5):R235-46.

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Break - - - - -
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Session13 - MEN’S Health: Hormones, Aging and Other Related Issues Salvatore Lacagnina, DO 1 1 1 1

This session is designed to explore the current research specific to the optimization of health and physiology for men throughout their lifespan. Dr. Sal Lacagnina will review the most recent evidence on key topics such as disease prevention, suspension and reversal, hormonal balance, erectile dysfunction, exercise and athletic performance and include actionable and integrative food and lifestyle interventions.

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Session 14 - WOMEN’S Health: Hormones, Aging and Other Related Issues Natalie Crawford, MD, MSCR 1 1 1 1

This session is designed to explore the current research specific to the optimization of health and physiology for women throughout their lifespan. Topics covered will include reproductive health, hormonal balance, maintenance of bone density, the prevention, suspension, and reversal of chronic diseases, exercise and athletic performance and key strategies utilizing food and lifestyle.

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Break - - - - -
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Session 15 - Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Ethnic Disparities, Covid-19 Mortality and Nutrition Kim Allan Williams, MD, FACC, FASNC, FAHA 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Session 16 – Deconstructing Paleo and Keto Diets Brenda Davis, RD 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

Monday, September 14
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Session 17 - Cultivate Change: A Parable of Four Soils Mark D. Faries, PhD 1 1 1 1

Summary:

Change is growth. It is starting with a seed to cultivate. It is planning, yet being flexible. It is gaining understanding, as knowledge is put into practice. It takes patience, diligence and care. It is pulling weeds, weathering storms, and defending against outside threats. Yet, it is also stopping to smell the flowers, reflecting, learning, and appreciating the beauty of the process. For the critical, first stages of behavior change, many patients are much like this seed, who depend on their healthcare provider to help cultivate change. However, the provider can face barriers to cultivation, and at worst, can inadvertently stunt patient growth. Through a parable of four soils, Dr. Faries illuminates the key, research-based strategies and practical tools to help give providers a ‘green thumb’ in cultivating healthy, lifestyle change for their patients.

Learning Objectives:

1. Demonstrate key strategies that help practitioners foster healthy, lifestyle change in their patients.
2. Recommend techniques on applying key strategies within the patient-provider relationship.
3. Develop personalization of key strategies for application within one’s own practice.

References:

1. Faries, M. D. & Kephart, W. (2018). The intention-behavior gap. In Lifestyle Medicine. Ed. Rippe. CRC Press, Taylor & Francis.
2. Faries, M.D. & Abreu, A. (2017). Medication adherence, when lifestyle is the medicine. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. doi: https://doi.org/10.1177/1559827617697922
3. Faries, M. D. (2016). Why we don’t “just do it” understanding the intention-behavior gap in lifestyle medicine. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 10(5), 322-329. doi: 10.1177/1559827616638017
4. Frates, B., Faries, M. D., & Katz, D. L. (in press). Lifestyle medicine. In Maxcy-Rosenau-Last Public Health and Preventive Medicine (16th Ed.). McGraw-Hill.

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Session 18 - Fasting Alan Goldhamer, DC 1 1 1 1

DESCRIPTION:

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Break - - - - -
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Session 19 - Skin Saving Foods: Translating the Science to the Dinner Plate to Healthy Skin Rajani Katta, MD 1 1 1 1

Summary:

Research findings from multiple laboratory, animal, and human studies have helped to define the complex link between nutrition and skin. A number of long-term observational population studies have documented that healthier diets are linked to fewer signs of skin aging, and animal and laboratory studies have helped to elucidate the biochemical processes that underlie these clinical findings. The key processes include oxidation, inflammation, and glycation. Dietary patterns, foods, and nutrients that influence these processes should be recommended to promote skin health.

Learning Objectives:

1. Demonstrate how the biochemical processes of oxidation, inflammation, and glycation are linked to physical changes in the skin.
2. Examine which dietary patterns, foods, and nutrients have demonstrated the strongest antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-glycation capabilities.
3. Analyze and interpret the epidemiologic and interventional studies connecting healthy dietary patterns to healthy skin.

References:

1. Katta R, Sanchez A, Tantry E. An Anti-Wrinkle Diet: Nutritional Strategies to Combat Oxidation, Inflammation and Glycation. Skin Therapy Lett. 2020;25(2):3-7.
2. Mekić S, Jacobs LC, Hamer MA, et al. A healthy diet in women is associated with less facial wrinkles in a large Dutch population-based cohort. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. 2019;80(5):1358-1363.e2. doi:10.1016/j.jaad.2018.03.033
3. Parrado C, Philips N, Gilaberte Y, Juarranz A, González S. Oral Photoprotection: Effective Agents and Potential Candidates. Front Med (Lausanne). 2018;5:188. doi:10.3389/fmed.2018.00188

7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Session 20 - Panel Discussion: Everyday Ideas for your Practice Scott Stoll, MD
Andy Bellatti, MS, RD
Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr., MD
Michael Klaper, MD
Laurie Marbas, MD, MBA
2 2 2 2

DESCRIPTION:
S. Stoll will moderate a guided discussion and Q&A session focused on the application of plant-based nutrition in a clinical setting.

OBJECTIVES:

1. Understand the different types of practice models and steps necessary to transition individual practices.
2. Develop a plan for implementation and modify individual clinical practices.
3. Answer the most common questions regarding the clinical practice of lifestyle medicine and implementation of practical, tested solutions that optimize patient care.

9:00 pm – 9:15 pm Closing Remarks Scott Stoll, MD - - - -

  • Agenda subject to change.
    ++ Assigned credit hours reflect what has been APPLIED for. Final credits will be determined in the Sumner of 2020. NUMBER OF CREDITS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.