2020 PBNHC Agenda* (ALL TIMES ARE EASTERN DAYLIGHT TIME)

Friday, September 11
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
3:30 pm – 4:00 pm Welcome Remarks Scott Stoll, MD - - - -
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Keynote Address... Power of the Plate: The Nexus of Regenerative Agriculture and Regenerative Human Health Scott Stoll, MD 1 1 1 0

Summary:

The food that fills a plate is one of the most underestimated influences today. Daily choices about the types of food that comprise a meal have far reaching effects that extend beyond human health. Yet, very few people stop to ask, “How and where was my food grown? and what are the long-term effects of the food that I am choosing to eat today?” Emerging research highlights inextricable interconnectedness of our food choices and the potential benefits or consequences to the health of every stakeholder in the food web. Dr. Stoll will review the newest research that reveals the power of the plate to potentially prevent suspend and reverse disease not only in humans but also agriculture and the soil that we are stewarding for future generations.

Learning Objectives:

1. Recognize the key components in soil that enhance the nutrient density of plant foods.
2. Analyze the impact of daily food choices on biochemical systems in the human body and soil.
3. Plan an interventional diet to improve the health of the human microbiome.

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Session 2 - Plant-Based Nutrition: Sweet Medicine for Insulin Resistance Michelle McMacken, MD 1 1 1 0

Summary:

This presentation will review evidence supporting the use of plant-based nutrition to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes, as well as to lower the risk of diabetes-related complications. Practical applications and resources will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

1. Evaluate the evidence supporting plant-based diets for the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes.
2. Examine the potential benefits of plant-based diets for reducing diabetes complications.
3. Recognize the potential mechanisms of plant-based diets in treating insulin resistance.

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Break - - - - -
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Session 3 - Can Lifestyle Changes Prevent & Reverse Dementia? Dean Ornish, MD 1 1 1 0

Summary:

Increasing scientific evidence indicates that comprehensive lifestyle changes, including a whole foods plant-based diet, may play an important role in preventing and helping to slow, stop, or possibly even reverse the progression of many forms of dementia. This presentation will review the strengths and limitations of the scientific evidence in this field as well as ongoing research.

Learning Objectives:

1. Examine the scientific evidence indicating that comprehensive lifestyle changes help prevent dementia.
2. Analyze how lifestyle changes affect the underlying biological mechanisms causing many forms of dementia.
3. Evaluate recent & ongoing research on the effects of lifestyle changes on the progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Session 4 - Bone, Cartilage, Diet: Correlations from the OR Thomas D. Rosenberg, MD 1 1 1 1

Summary:

The Standard American Diet is inflammatory and that extends to the level of the synovium. Dr. Rosenberg will share his novel research findings that demonstrate synovial inflammation based on dietary composition and resolution of inflammation with a shift in diet. A research review will be utilized to describe the mechanism and foods that initiate the inflammatory cascade.

Learning Objectives:

1. Demonstrate the measurable and visible synovial inflammation from the SAD.
2. Analyze the association between skin carotenoids, inflammatory biomarkers and tissue inflammation.
3. Recommend strategies to improve the musculoskeletal health of clients.

Saturday, September 12
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Session 5 - Plant-based Diets for Cancer Prevention and Treatment Shireen Kassam MBBS, FRCPath, PhD 1 1 1 0

Summary:

This talk will summarize data on the role of diet and nutrition for cancer prevention and treatment. In addition to summarizing international recommendations, the talk will highlight recent studies and evidence, which lend further support for predominately plant-based diets and provide data on novel mechanisms by which diet can impact all aspects of cancer development.

Learning Objectives:

1. To evaluate and assess the current recommendations on diet and nutrition for cancer prevention.
2. Examine and interpret recent studies that support plant-based nutrition for all aspects of cancer development and novel mechanisms of action.
3. Assess the role a predominately plant-based diet has in reducing cancer risk in patients.
4. Utilize international recommendations to provide dietary interventions recommendations for patients with cancer at diagnosis, during treatment and through survivorship.
5. Describe and demonstrate novel mechanisms by which plant-based diets may benefit all stages of cancer development.

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Session 6 - The Pleasure Trap: Mastering the Hidden Force that Undermines Health and Happiness Doug Lisle, PhD 1 1 1 0

Summary:

In this presentation, psychologist Doug Lisle will explore the hidden forces that make healthful living so surprisingly challenging. You will learn that humans have motivational mechanisms that are stoked by specific chemicals that lead to addictive-like behavior patterns in eating. People are currently confronted with a behavioral dilemma that is completely unnatural for our species, and it can be critical to understand this dilemma in order to effectively pursue a healthy lifestyle. Dr. Lisle terms this challenge “the pleasure trap”, and his discussion includes specific techniques for helping people to overcome its force.

Learning Objectives:

1. Demonstrate how to recognize dietary patterns that resemble addictive problems.
2. Examine major motivational forces that influence all behavior.
3. Analyze appropriate methods for managing food-addiction problems.

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Break - - - - -
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Session 7 - Dietary Fiber: The Preferred Food of Our Gut Microbes Will Bulsiewicz, MD, MSCI 1 1 1 1

Summary:

New research has made it clear that our gut microbes play a critical role in human health. Far more than just digestion, they are deeply intertwined with our immune system, metabolism, hormones, mood and brain function. These microbes must be fed in order to do their job, and their preferred food is the fiber found in plants. In this lecture, we will explore the relationship between our gut microbes and dietary fiber and how this has a positive impact on health throughout the entire body.

Learning Objectives:

1. Recognize the connection between our gut microbiota and our metabolism, immune system, hormones and brain function.
2. Demonstrate how to use dietary fiber to enhance our gut microbiota and improve our health.
3. Demonstrate the effects of short chain fatty acids (butyrate, acetate and propionate) on immune function, metabolism, and brain function.

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Session 8 - The History of Nutrition and Health: What We Know, What We Don't Know, What We Need to Know T. Colin Campbell, PhD 1 1 1 1

Summary:

A comprehensive historical review of nutritional literature based upon Dr. Campbell’s 65 years of experience in nutrition and human health. The lecture will present a new way to think about nutrition with intelligent perspectives based on historical review of the science and policies that shaped our understanding today. He will answer important questions like, is nutrition and health related to nutrient intake and do pesticides and GMO crops cause cancer?

Learning Objectives:

1. Recognize key historical events that have impacted current nutritional understanding and recommendations.
2. Analyze the false statements in ubiquitous nutritional myths that have created confusion.
3. Assess the contribution of GMO and pesticides to the initiation of chronic disease.
4. Determine the key sites where pesticides and GMO’s contribute to disease formation and or progression.

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Break - - - - -
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Session 9 - Essentials of Practical Application of Plant Based Nutrition in Clinical Practice Robert Ostfeld, MD, MSc, FACC 1 1 1 1

Summary:

How can a busy practitioner implement important lifestyle interventions into daily clinical practice? Dr. Robert Ostfeld, an award winning academic and clinical cardiologist, will share strategies and tools that he has developed to help patients and systems implement a whole food plant based dietary lifestyle. The presentation will also focus on the science of behavior change and key elements of coaching that are critical when working with patients to create sustainable, lasting lifestyle changes. Dr. Ostfeld will review outcomes from patients within his Cardiac Wellness Program and he will describe strategies to assist plant-based and lifestyle medicine practitioners in the development of productive working relationships with hospital administrators in order to create and implement new programs.

Learning Objectives:

1. Examine strategies for implementing system changes within hospital systems.
2. Demonstrate proven behavior change strategies.
3. Develop a plan to implement plant-based nutrition into your daily practice.

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Session 10 - Long- term Health Effects of Vegetarian Diets – Evidence From the Tzu Chi Cohorts Tina H. T. Chiu, PhD, RD, MPH 1 1 1 1

Summary:

Plant-based dietary patterns have been shown to reduce major chronic diseases, particularly cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and some types of cancer. In the Tzu Chi cohorts which consist of devoted Buddhists volunteers who refrain from smoking and alcohol drinking, and devote their lives to community service, environmental protection and cultivation of compassion, vegetarian diet has been associated with lower incidences of diabetes, stroke, gout, gallstones, urinary tract infection, and an overall lower medical expenditure. This presentation will introduce these amazing volunteers, how they beautify the island of Taiwan and around the globe, and the journey of a nutritional epidemiologist learning how their diet and lifestyle contribute to disease prevention and wellness.

Learning Objectives:

1. Assemble evidence on how vegetarian diets affect long term health outcomes on stroke, diabetes, gout, gallstone and other studies from the Tzu Chi cohort studies
2. Update evidences on how vegetarian diet affect health outcomes from other prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials.
3. Interpret consistency and discrepancy in different studies, potential mechanisms, and potential application in clinical practices.

Sunday, September 13
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm Session 11 - Plant-based Diet’s Role in Preventing and Treating Crohn’s Disease Alan Desmond, MD 1 1 1 1

Summary:

Dr Alan Desmond describes why Crohn’s disease has become a slow-motion epidemic and describes the aspects of the Standard Western Diet that have been implicated in causing and aggravating this form of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. He then reviews the evidence supporting a whole food, plant-based dietary intervention for Crohn’s disease and illustrates the implementation of this intervention with case histories from his practice.

Learning Objectives:

1. To demonstrate the etiology and epidemiology of Crohn’s disease and current treatment strategies.
2. To recognize the characteristics of the Standard Western Diet that contribute to the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease.
3. To examine how a whole food plant-based diet can increase the likelihood of attaining remission in Crohn’s disease.

2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Session 12 - How Not to Diet: Evidence-Based Weight Loss Michael Greger, MD 1 1 1 1

Summary:

What does the science show is the best way to lose weight? Dr. Greger has comprehensively reviewed the world’s scholarly literature in preparation for his book How Not to Diet and applied the conclusions to the development of this new presentation. He will review the outcomes of diet research, optimal dietary pattern for long-term weight management, 17 ingredients to the optimal weight loss diet and cover some of the 2 tricks and tweaks for fast-tracking weight loss, which include specific foods that can double as fat blockers and fat burners, starch blockers and appetite suppressants.

Learning Objectives:

1. Name three dietary components that may be considered characteristic of an optimal weight loss diet.
2. Detail the randomized, controlled study that, without caloric restriction or an exercise component, led to the greatest reported weight loss at both 6 and 12 months.
3. Name the foods that can act as fat blockers, starch blockers, appetite suppressants, and that can counter the metabolic slowing that accompanies weight loss.

3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Break - - - - -
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Session 13 - Angiogenesis and the Role of Endothelial Cells in COVID-19: How Can a Plant-based Diet Help? William Li, MD 1 1 1 0

Summary:

COVID-19 is the greatest health threat of the past 100 years. The respiratory virus SARS-COV-2 causes pulmonary disease, but also infects vascular endothelium, leading to severe vascular damage including thrombosis. This vascular effect can explain many COVID-19 systemic epiphenomena and has implications for clinical management and recovery from infection. While vaccines, steroids, and antiviral therapies are critical interventions, dietary factors can also play a role to ameliorate COVID-19 vascular damage. This presentation will review current knowledge about COVID-19, the pathogenesis of its vascular effects, and potential strategies for limiting vascular damage by protecting vascular endothelial cells using the principles of a plant-based diet.

Learning Objectives:

1. To examine the pathology of COVID-19 and recognize how the respiratory virus causes a vascular disease.
2. To analyze vascular complications of COVID-19 and their clinical significance.
3. To evaluate the data supporting plant-based approaches for vascular health as a COVID-19 intervention.

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Session 14 - Food is Medicine: Simple and Proven Steps to Fill Your Plate with Healthy and Delicious Food Julieanna Hever, MS, RD, CPT 1 1 1 1

Summary:
A whole food, plant-based diet has been associated with myriad, significant health advantages. But transitioning to this new way of life may be overwhelming initially, as you learn this new language and your habits are being formed. From shopping to meal planning and stocking your kitchen to supplement needs, Julieanna will dive deep into practical solutions to make eating delicious, nutritious plants effortless. This lecture covers how to get the most of what a plant palate proffers.

Learning Objectives:
1. To translate the behavioral science into practical, applicable behaviors to help patients implement health-promoting habits.
2. To recognize and utilize a well-rounded, nutritionally-optimal whole food, plant-based diet.
3. To demonstrate strategies and systems for clinicians to use to help facilitate patients and clients to better prepare and plan healthful meals and habits.

6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Break - - - - -
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm Session 15 - Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Ethnic Disparities, Covid-19 Mortality and Nutrition Kim Allan Williams, MD, FACC, FASNC, FAHA 1 1 1 1

Summary:

Based on preliminary U.S. data, persons with underlying health conditions such as diabetes mellitus, chronic lung disease, and cardiovascular disease, appear to be at higher risk for severe COVID-19–associated disease than persons without these conditions. Obesity is one of the biggest risk factors for severe COVID-19 disease, particularly among younger patients. Under 60, obesity was twice as likely to result in hospitalization for COVID-19 and also significantly increased the likelihood that a person would end up in intensive care. Obesity [in people < 60 years] appears to be a previously unrecognized risk factor for hospital admission and need for critical care. This has important and practical implications when nearly 40% of adults in the US are obese with a body mass index [BMI] of ≥ 30. The greater prevalence of risk factors and obesity, due to nutrition and lifestyle, in African Americans puts this population at much greater risk of both pandemics: CV mortality and COVID-19 serious illness and death.

Learning Objectives:

1. Explain the relationship between nutrients and death from heart disease.
2. Examine the effect of diet on risk factors for heart attack, stroke, hypertension, diabetes, obesity and death.
3. Relate the changes in coronary plaque occurring with plant-based diet.
4. Summarize the long-term effects of plant-based diet.
5. Describe the excess cardiovascular mortality in African Americans, based on nutrition-related risk factors and disease
6. Discuss the risk factors for poor outcomes with COVID-19: obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, resulting in poorer outcomes in African Americans.

8:00 pm – 9:00 pm Session 16 – Deconstructing Paleo and Keto Diets Brenda Davis, RD 1 1 1 0

Summary:

Keto and paleo diets are currently viewed by many as the answer to our health crisis. Both keto and paleo have hit #1 on Google search for diets. The keto diet is the most extreme of all low-carb diets, with less than 5% of energy coming from carbohydrates, and at least 75% from fat. The Paleo diet is the least extreme of the low-carb diets, with about 20% of calories from carbohydrates, and about 50% of calories from fat. However, it provides about 30% of calories from protein, with a huge emphasis on animal protein. Foods widely perceived as healthful, like legumes and whole grains, are eliminated in both diets. Brenda Davis, RD examines the claims of the keto and paleo movements – the pluses, minuses, and the broader implications of these popular dietary trends.

Learning Objectives:

1. At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to recognize the typical macronutrient ranges typical of the keto and paleo diets.
2. At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to demonstrate 5 short and 5 long term consequences of following a keto diet.
3. At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to interpret at least 3 large studies that have demonstrated that animal protein increases mortality relative to plant protein.

Monday, September 14
TIME DESCRIPTION PRESENTER(S) CME CNE CEU CPE
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Session 17 - Cultivate Change: A Parable of Four Soils Mark D. Faries, PhD 1 1 1 0

Summary:

Change is growth. It is starting with a seed to cultivate. It is planning, yet being flexible. It is gaining understanding, as knowledge is put into practice. It takes patience, diligence and care. It is pulling weeds, weathering storms, and defending against outside threats. Yet, it is also stopping to smell the flowers, reflecting, learning, and appreciating the beauty of the process. For the critical, first stages of change, patient behavior is much like this seed, who depend on their healthcare provider to help cultivate change. However, the provider can face barriers to cultivation, and at worst, can inadvertently stunt patient growth. Through a parable of four soils, Dr. Faries illuminates the key, research-based strategies and practical tools to help give providers a ‘green thumb’ in cultivating healthy, lifestyle change for their patients.

Learning Objectives:

1. Demonstrate key strategies that help practitioners foster healthy, lifestyle change in their patients.
2. Recommend techniques on applying key strategies within the patient-provider relationship.
3. Develop personalization of key strategies for application within one’s own practice.

4:00 pm – 5:00 pm Session 18 – Can Fasting Save Your Life? Alan Goldhamer, DC 1 1 1 1

Summary:

The use of intermittent and prolonged fasting has gained significant interest. This presentation reviews a number of original studies performed at the TrueNorth Health Center and published in peer-reviewed journals on the application of fasting in a variety of conditions including high blood pressure, diabetes, autoimmune disorders and lymphoma. The papers include a fasting safety study, a study done in conjunction with the Mayo clinic on the primary prevention of stroke, a study on the changes that occur in taste perception after fasting and a number of case reports. Indications, contraindications and changes in biomarkers will be reviewed. We also have been using a DEXA scanner to assess changes in body composition and in particular the effect of fasting on visceral fat. The presentation will also briefly review the dietary approach before and after fasting that utilizes an exclusively whole plant food diet free of added salt, oil and sugar.

Learning Objectives:

1. Recognize the indications and contraindications of fasting.
2. Analyze changes in biomarkers related to fasting.
3. Examine the various conditions that appear to respond to fasting.

5:00 pm – 6:00 pm Break - - - - -
6:00 pm – 7:00 pm Session 19 - Skin Saving Foods: Translating the Science to the Dinner Plate to Healthy Skin Rajani Katta, MD 1 1 1 1

Summary:

Research findings from multiple laboratory, animal, and human studies have helped to define the complex link between nutrition and skin. A number of long-term observational population studies have documented that healthier diets are linked to fewer signs of skin aging, and animal and laboratory studies have helped to elucidate the biochemical processes that underlie these clinical findings. The key processes include oxidation, inflammation, and glycation. Dietary patterns, foods, and nutrients that influence these processes should be recommended to promote skin health.

Learning Objectives:

1. Demonstrate how the biochemical processes of oxidation, inflammation, and glycation are linked to physical changes in the skin.
2. Examine which dietary patterns, foods, and nutrients have demonstrated the strongest antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-glycation capabilities.
3. Analyze and interpret the epidemiological and interventional studies connecting healthy dietary patterns to healthy skin.

7:00 pm – 9:00 pm Session 20 - Panel Discussion: Everyday Ideas for your Practice Scott Stoll, MD
Andy Bellatti, MS, RD
Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr., MD
Michael Klaper, MD
Laurie Marbas, MD, MBA
2 2 2 0

Summary:

S. Stoll, A. Bellatti, Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr., MD, M. Klaper, Laurie Marbas. A guided discussion and Q&A session focused on the application of plant-based nutrition in a clinical setting.

Learning Objectives:

1. Compare and contrast the different types of practice models and steps necessary to transition individual practices to include lifestyle medicine interventions.
2. Develop a plan for first steps toward the implementation and/or modification of individual clinical practices.
3. Examine and answer the most common questions regarding the clinical practice of lifestyle medicine and implementation of practical, tested solutions that optimize patient care.

9:00 pm – 9:15 pm Closing Remarks Scott Stoll, MD - - - -

  • Agenda subject to change.
    ++ NUMBER OF CREDITS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.